Cl-

General Information (more on wikipidia)

Species Molecular Weight Density Radius Reference
Cl- 35.453  g·mol−1 3.2 g/L 100 pm [1]

The chloride ion is formed when the element chlorine picks up one electron to form an anion (negatively-charged ion) Cl−. The salts of hydrochloric acid HCl contain chloride ions and can also be called chlorides. An example is table salt, which is sodium chloride with the chemical formula NaCl. In water, it dissolves into Na+ and Cl− ions.
The word chloride can also refer to a chemical compound in which one or more chlorine atoms are covalently bonded in the molecule. This means that chlorides can be either inorganic or organic compounds. The simplest example of an inorganic covalently-bonded chloride is hydrogen chloride, HCl. A simple example of an organic covalently-bonded (an organochloride) chloride is chloromethane (CH3Cl), often called methyl chloride.

Chloride ions have important physiological roles. For instance, in the central nervous system, the inhibitory action of glycine and some of the action of GABA relies on the entry of Cl− into specific neurons. Also, the chloride-bicarbonate exchanger biological transport protein relies on the chloride ion to increase the blood's capacity of carbon dioxide, in the form of the bicarbonate ion.
The North American Dietary Reference Intake recommends a daily intake of between 2300 and 3600 mg/day for 25-year-old males.

Diffusion of in water:

  • Alone at 25 degrees: $D = 2500 \ \mu m^{2} s^{-1}$ [1]

Diffusion of in PBS:

  • $D = \ \mu m^{2} s^{-1}$

Diffusion of in cellular matrix:

  • $D = \ \mu m^{2} s^{-1}$
Bibliography
1. Horvath, A. L. 1985. Handbook of aqueous electrolyte solutions: physical properties, estimation and correlation methods. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, N.Y.
Unless otherwise stated, the content of this page is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License