Formic Acid

General Information (more on wikipidia)

Species Molecular Weight (g/mol) Density (g/L) Radius (m) Reference
Formic acid 46.0254 D R [1]

Formic acid (systematically called methanoic acid) is the simplest carboxylic acid. Its formula is HCOOH or CH2O2. It is an important intermediate in chemical synthesis and occurs naturally, most famously in the venom of bee and ant stings.
In nature, it is found in the stings and bites of many insects of the order Hymenoptera, mainly ants. It is also a significant combustion product resulting from alternative fueled vehicles burning methanol (and ethanol, if contaminated with water) when mixed with gasoline. Its name comes from the Latin word for ant, formica, referring to its early isolation by the distillation of ant bodies. A chemical compound such as a salt from the neutralization of formic acid with a base, or an ester derived from formic acid, is referred to as formate (or methanoate). The formate ion has the formula HCOO−.

Diffusion of in water:

  • Alone at 25 degrees: $D = 1410 \ \mu m^{2} s^{-1}$ [1]

Diffusion of in PBS:

Diffusion of in cellular matrix:

Bibliography
1. Cussler, E. L. 1984. Diffusion - mass transfer in fluid systems. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
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