General Information (more on wikipidia)

Species Molecular Weight (g/mol) Density (g/L) Radius (m) Reference
Glutamine 146.15 D R [1]

Glutamine (Gln, Q) is one of the 20 amino acids encoded by the standard genetic code. Its side chain is an amide; it is formed by replacing a side-chain hydroxyl of glutamic acid with an amine functional group.

Glutamine is genetically coded for by the DNA codons CAA and CAG. Glutamine's three-letter abbreviation is Gln, and its one-letter abbreviation is Q. A three-letter designation for either glutamine or glutamic acid is Glx (one-letter abbreviation: Z).
Like other amino acids, glutamine is biochemically important as a constituent of proteins. Glutamine is also crucial in nitrogen metabolism. Ammonia (formed by nitrogen fixation) is assimilated into organic compounds by converting glutamic acid to glutamine. The enzyme that accomplishes this is called glutamine synthetase. Glutamine can, hence, be used as a nitrogen donor in the biosynthesis of many compounds, including other amino acids, purines, and pyrimidines.

Diffusion of in water:

  • Alone at 25 degrees: $D = 760 \ \mu m^{2} s^{-1}$ [1]

Diffusion of in PBS:

  • $D = \ \mu m^{2} s^{-1}$

Diffusion of in cellular matrix:

  • $D = \ \mu m^{2} s^{-1}$
1. Longsworth, L. G. 1955. Diffusion in liquids and the Stokes-Einstein relation, p. 225-247. In T. Shedlovsky (ed.), Electrochemistry in biology and medicine. John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, N.Y.
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