Maltose

General Information (more on wikipidia)

Species Molecular Weight (g/mol) Density (g/L) Radius (m) Reference
Maltose 342.296 1540 R [1]

Maltose, or malt sugar, is a disaccharide formed from two units of glucose joined with an α(1→4) linkage. It is the second member of an important biochemical series of glucose chains. The addition of another glucose unit yields maltotriose; further additions will produce dextrins (also called maltodextrins) and eventually starch.
Maltose can be broken down into two glucose molecules by hydrolysis. In living organisms, the enzyme maltase can achieve this very rapidly. In the laboratory, heating with a strong acid for several minutes will produce the same result.
The production of maltose in germinating cereals, such as barley, is an important part of the brewing process. When barley is malted, it is brought into a condition in which the concentration of maltose has been maximized. Metabolism of maltose by yeast during fermentation then leads to the production of ethanol and carbon dioxide.

Diffusion of in water:

  • $D = 480 \ \mu m^{2} s^{-1}$ [1]

Diffusion of in PBS:

  • $D = \ \mu m^{2} s^{-1}$

Diffusion of in cellular matrix:

  • $D = \ \mu m^{2} s^{-1}$
Bibliography
1. Perry, R. H., and C. H. Chilton. 1973. Chemical engineers' handbook, 5th ed. McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York, N.Y.
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